My garden companions have returned…

I have been uplifted by three straight days of robin sightings.  The robins are back in the area my friends.  I have seen a pair of them frequenting my deck.

I wonder if they are the babies from last year that the mother robin so meticulously watched over.  I wonder if they have come back hoping to frolic in the garden again.  Alas, the garden is still under snow.  I am hoping they know things that I do not about the onset of spring’s long-awaited entry.  I am hoping that they are themselves the messengers of spring.

Last year when I discovered that we had baby robins in a nest under the deck I fretted.  I was worried that the dogs might disturb their nest or that a wandering feline might lie in wait for one to plop out of the nest.  I was ever so grateful when they started to fly about and seemed a bit further removed from potential harm.

They stayed close to home and I enjoyed seeing them out in the yard all summer long.  They would sit on the trellis or fence and watch me planting and tending the garden.  They always seemed so fascinated with what I was doing – as if I was the novelty in their garden. Perhaps I was.

Eventually the summer turned into fall and then the fall turned into what has become the never-ending winter.  The truth is,  I had all but forgotten the joy I had derived from the robins calling our yard home…until I saw them again.  Their presence now acts to buoy my spirits.  I know that soon we will all be out in the garden again – me planting and tending and the robins watching me curiously.  I cannot imagine a better way to spend my days. ;-)

Day one thousand three hundred and eighty-two of the new forty – obla di obla da

Ms. C

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About Ms. C

I teach at NDSU...but I remain a student of life with all the enthusiasm that entails. My favorite saying is, "Sometimes you have to take the leap and build your wings on the way down." In the new forty that is what I am doing...building my wings.
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3 Responses to My garden companions have returned…

  1. Ms S says:

    At our home we also enjoy the robins return. Years ago we started putting handfuls of raisins outside a few times a day for the robins to enjoy. It’s a joy to watch them fill their beaks and head off to feed nestfuls of baby robins. I’m guessing it’s faster and easier to provide a meal this way, instead of worms.
    Most likely it is the same robins who have returned to your home. We figured out it is the same ones returning here because they sit just outside the kitchen window and chirp at us, until we come outside with the bag of raisins. Not typical behavior for a robin who hasn’t been fed at all! Yes…we know, we have been trained by the robins not the other way around, but it is a joy to watch mom and dad bring an entire family of baby robins to the picnic table and feed them the raisins there.

    • B-dubya says:

      That sounds like great fun, Ms S! We always toss out bread crumbs for the crows and one summer we got adopted by a HUGE crow that would pace back and forth by our back door when the crumbs ran out. He’d caw at the top of his lungs for awhile and then mutter awhile and then caw some more til he got his grub. Bird lovers that we are, we named him Sebastion and did just what you did–had a whole complicated (and very satisfying) relationship. :D

      • Ms S says:

        That is neat! Lots of people think birds act on instinct but there is lots of learning going on in those little bird brains. I used to worry I was domesticating the robins and they would be in danger from people, but they learned who immediate family are and if other people are in the yard they are very cautious. I’m glad to hear I’m not the only one feeding the birds and bonding with the ones in my own space!\. Thanks for sharing.

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